Cincinnati Theft Crimes Lawyer

Being arrested on suspicion of committing a theft crime in Cincinnati can be a frightening and traumatizing experience. And once you move past the initial shock of being taken into police custody, you will almost certainly begin to worry about being fined or sent to prison.

Fortunately, you cannot face either of these punishments unless the prosecution can successfully convict you of your offense. As such, it is in your best interest to make their job as challenging as possible. An experienced Cincinnati theft crimes lawyer, like those here at Suhre & Associates, LLC, can help you do just that.

How a Suhre & Associates, LLC, Criminal Defense Lawyer Can Help You Fight Back Against the State’s Accusations

Our Cincinnati criminal defense lawyer here at Suhre & Associates, LLC, is committed to fighting tirelessly on behalf of the people of Cincinnati. So, when you ask us for assistance with your theft crime case, you can expect us to:

Protect Your Constitutional Rights

When investigating, arresting, and prosecuting you on a theft charge, the state of Ohio and its representatives are obliged to respect your constitutional rights. Most notably, they are required to respect your Fourth Amendment right to avoid unreasonable searches and seizures as well as your Fifth Amendment right to avoid self-incrimination. Unfortunately, in an effort to land a conviction, overzealous police officers and prosecutors sometimes violate those rights.

Having worked in the legal field for many years, the attorneys here at Suhre & Associates, LLC, have become experts at spotting rights violations as they happen. If a prosecutor or law enforcement officer crosses the line during your case, we will immediately step in and address the situation.

Negotiate a Plea Bargain Agreement

Depending on the circumstances surrounding your theft offense, the prosecuting attorney may not want to take it to trial. Instead, they might prefer to offer you a reduced sentence in return for an early guilty plea. Of course, before you consider accepting such a deal, you would be wise to negotiate its terms first.

Over the years, the Suhre & Associates, LLC, team has negotiated countless plea bargain deals with prosecutors in Cincinnati. As such, we understand what they need to see and hear before they will offer more lenient terms. When you hire us, we will work tirelessly to try to land you a favorable deal.

Represent You at Your Trial

If the prosecuting attorney is unwilling or unable to offer you a fair plea bargain deal, your theft case will almost certainly end up in court. There, your case will be reviewed and adjudicated on by a judge and a jury of your peers. If you would like this process to run smoothly, you will need to have an experienced attorney by your side throughout.

Fortunately, when you hire a Suhre & Associates, LLC, attorney, “experience” is exactly what you will get. We have been representing defendants in courtrooms across Ohio for many years, and we are ready to use the knowledge and skill that we have amassed during that time to help ensure that you receive a fair trial.

Are you ready to begin the process of fighting back against your Ohio theft charges? Then please reach out to the legal team here at Suhre & Associates, LLC, today. We would love to arrange a free consultation at our Cincinnati law offices to discuss your case in greater detail.

Understanding Ohio’s Theft Laws

The term “theft” can broadly be defined as the act of taking another person’s property or services without their permission. The most commonly charged theft offenses in the state of Ohio include:

Petty Theft

Section 2913.02 of the Ohio Revised Code states that an individual may be charged with petty theft if they knowingly obtain or exert control over another person’s property or services (valued at less than $1,000), under the following circumstances:

  • Without the consent of the property owner or their representative
  • Beyond the scope of the consent granted by the property owner or their representative
  • By deception
  • By intimidation
  • By threat

Under Ohio law, petty theft is generally classified as a misdemeanor of the first degree.

Theft

Section 2913.02 of the Ohio Revised Code also explains that a person may be charged with theft if they knowingly obtain or exert control over another individual’s property or services (valued between $1,000 and $7,500), under the following circumstances:

  • Without the consent of the property owner or their representative
  • Beyond the scope of the consent granted by the property owner or their representative
  • By deception
  • By intimidation
  • By threat

According to section 2913.71 of the Ohio Revised Code, a person may also be charged with theft, regardless of the value of the property, if the stolen item was:

  • A credit card
  • A check
  • A motor vehicle license plate
  • A blank form for a certificate of title

In the state of Ohio, theft is almost always punishable as a felony of the fifth degree.

Grand Theft

Section 2913.02 of the Ohio Revised Code continues by explaining that a person may be charged with grand theft if they knowingly obtain or exert control over another individual’s property or services (valued between $7,500 and $150,000), under the following circumstances:

  • Without the consent of the property owner or their representative
  • Beyond the scope of the consent granted by the property owner or their representative
  • By deception
  • By intimidation
  • By threat

An individual may also be charged with grand theft if they steal a firearm or a motor vehicle, regardless of the value of the item.

In most cases, grand theft is classified as a felony of the fourth degree. However, the state of Ohio can upgrade it to a third-degree felony when the stolen item is a firearm.

Aggravated Theft

Section 2913.02 of the Ohio Revised Code concludes by stating that an individual may be charged with aggravated theft if they knowingly obtain or exert control over another individual’s property or services (valued at more than $150,000), under the following circumstances:

  • Without the consent of the property owner or their representative
  • Beyond the scope of the consent granted by the property owner or their representative
  • By deception
  • By intimidation
  • By threat

This offense is almost always punishable as a felony of the third degree. However, if the value of the stolen items is between $750,000 and $1,500,000, it can be upgraded to a second-degree felony. When the stolen goods are worth more than $1,500,000, the state of Ohio typically classifies aggravated theft as a first-degree felony.

If you have been arrested on suspicion of committing any of the offenses listed above and need an experienced criminal defense attorney to provide you with astute legal advice, please do not hesitate to pick up the phone and give the Suhre & Associates, LLC, team a call. We are always ready, willing, and able to assist.

Consequences of a Theft Conviction in the State of Ohio

Theft offenses are classified as crimes of moral turpitude in Ohio – and just about every other state in the Union. As such, individuals who are found guilty of committing theft offenses typically suffer some severe repercussions. These repercussions generally fall into two main categories – criminal and collateral:

Criminal Consequences of Ohio Theft Convictions

Individuals who are convicted of theft offenses in Ohio may face the following criminal penalties:

  • First-Degree Misdemeanors: Up to 180 days in jail and a fine of up to $1,000.
  • Fifth-Degree Felonies: 6 to 12 months in prison and a fine of up to $2,500.
  • Fourth-Degree Felonies: 6 to 18 months in prison and a fine of up to $5,000.
  • Third-Degree Felonies: 1 to 5 years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000.
  • Second-Degree Felonies: 2 to 8 years in prison and a fine of up to $15,000.
  • First-Degree Felonies: 3 to 11 years in prison and a fine of up to $20,000

First-time offenders typically receive sentences that are on the lower end of these guidelines. Repeat offenders, on the other hand, usually receive much more severe punishments.

Collateral Consequences of Ohio Theft Convictions

In addition to fines and prison sentences, individuals who are found guilty of theft offenses in Ohio also receive permanent criminal records. This record can force them to endure a wide range of collateral consequences, such as:

  • Immigration Issues: Non-citizen convicted felons are often deported after they have served their prison sentences.
  • Loss of Gun Ownership Rights: The state of Ohio does not allow felons to own, carry, or use firearms.
  • Housing Issues: Landlords and property managers are often hesitant to rent homes to convicted felons.
  • Employment Issues: Many companies have strict policies that prevent them from hiring people with criminal records.

Is the state of Ohio accusing you of stealing property from another person? If so, please do not hesitate to contact the attorneys here at Suhre & Associates, LLC, in Cincinnati. We may be able to help you get your charges dismissed or reduced.

Your Trusted Cincinnati Theft Crimes Lawyer

When the people of Cincinnati need an attorney to help them fight back against their theft charges, they know that there is only one law firm they need to turn to – Suhre & Associates, LLC. We have the knowledge and experience needed to handle even the most complex cases. To learn more about our legal services or set up a free consultation with a member of our team, just give us a call or contact us online.